logo Livestock Forum

Networking day / 27 April 2017

Montjuïc Venue

Feed the future.
livestock performance.

Thank you for coming!

We look forward to seeing you in Livestock Forum 2018

2017

Networking day27 April

Welcome to Livestock Forum 2017! 
#livestockforum

Livestock Forum Networking Day 2017 is an international forum specialized in animal health that will address issues related to optimization of livestock production processes, demand of animal protein and the impact of final consumer decisions on the productive process.

In this second edition, we will focus on trends, problems and solutions on two key aspects of animal health:

- PRECISION LIVESTOCK FARMING
- ANIMAL WELFARE AND EFFICIENCY

Participate

Networking day

PROGRAM

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Registration

9:00-09:30
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Institutional inaguration

09:30-10:00
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Opening ceremony

10:00-11:00

Animal production: where are we going?
Chairman: Joan Tibau Research at IRTA
Andrea Rosati - Secretary General of EAAP


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Coffee break

11:00-11:30
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The control and monitoring of every production unit are key to the development of the famrs and models of the future. List of measures used with Food Safety - Food Security. Overall concept: design of the facilities, tools, measures and data management creating value and helping in the decision making.

Precission livestock farming

11:30-14:00

Chairman: Àlex Bach – ICREA Research Professor
Use of technologies to optimize animal production

Tomas Norton – KU Leuven Professor
Precision feeding and Nutrition

J.Y. Dourmad – Research at the French National Institute for Agricultural Research (INRA)
Data management and data - based decision making

Carlos Piñeiro - Business Development in Swine Research Farm

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Networking lunch

14:00-15:00
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Animal welfare has become a relevant tool to improve efficiency and competitiveness in livestock. With the aim of discussing this win-to-win approach, the conference will analyse the role of animal welfare in sustainable production systems, the animal adaptation capacity and the welfare assessment on-farm.

Animal welfare and efficiency: Is efficiency compatible with welfare?

15:00-17:30

Chairman: Toni Velarde – Head of the Animal Welfare Research Subprogram (IRTA)
Towards Sustainability

Donald Broom – Animal welfare professor at Cambridge University
Farm size and animal welfare

Dan Weary | Animal welfare professor at UBC
Welfare Assessment

Toni Dalmau – Research at IRTA

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Closing ceremony

17:30-18:30

HOW TO PARTICIPATE

Choose the options that best suit your needs

EARLY BIRD LAST DAYS: register for 121€ (VAT Included).

Gold

€4.000*

  • 12 Delegate Pass
  • Top Table
  • 1 item inside delegate kit
  • Logo on website - Level 1
  • Logo at the entrance
  • Logo in communication campaigns
  • Interview in newsletter
  • 1 Parking space
  • *VAT Not Included

 

Silver

€3.000*

  • 8 Delegate Pass
  • Top Table
  • 1 item inside delegate kit
  • Logo on website - Level 2
  • Logo at the entrance
  • Logo in communication campaigns
  • *VAT Not Included

Bronze

2.000€*

  • 4 Delegate Pass
  • 1 item inside delegate kit
  • Logo at the entrance
  • Logo in communication campaigns
  • *VAT Not Included

UNIQUE
SPONSORSHIP

OPPORTUNITIES

€2,000*

  • Lanyard €2,000
  • Wi-Fi €2,000
  • Badge €2,000
  • *VAT Not Included

Congress

  • Congress acces
  • Networking lunch
  • Cloakroom
  • Delegate kit
  • From 1 to 4 units: 125€*
  • From 5 to 9 units: 110€*
  • From 10 units: 100€*
  • *VAT Not Included

NETWORKING DAY '16

Last edition was a success

 

78 Companies represented

150Congressmen

12Speakers

  • David Torrallardona
    A drastic increase in the global demand for animal products is expected for the next decades. The challenges faced by current animal production systems to meet such demand in a sustainable way will be discussed

    More info
    David Torrallardona
    IRTA
    CV
    NUTRITION: CHALLENGING ANIMAL FEEDING
    Animal Production and Environmental Sustainability
  • Sandra Edwards
    Both the formulation of the diet and the method of feeding can affect animal welfare. However, in turn, the welfare state of the animal can also affect feeding behaviour and feed utilisation. This lecture will explore these two-way relationships and how such knowledge can be exploited in different livestock production systems

    More info
    Sandra Edwards
    New Castle University
    CV
    NUTRITION: CHALLENGING ANIMAL FEEDING
    Nutrition and Animal Welfare Indicators
  • Isabelle Oswald
    Food safety is a major issue throughout the world. In this respect, much attention needs to be paid to the possible contamination of food and feed by fungi and the risk of mycotoxin production

    More info
    Isabelle Oswald
    INRA
    CV
    NUTRITION: CHALLENGING ANIMAL FEEDING
    Effect of Mycotoxins on Reduced Efficiency with Environmental Consequences
  • Jack Dekkers
    Genetic improvement has been very effective at increasing levels of production in livestock but not at improving resistance to disease.

    More info
    Jack Dekkers
    Iowa State University
    CV
    ANIMAL HEALTH: ALTERNATIVES TO THE USE OF ANTIBIOTICS
    Using Genetics to Improve Resistance to Disease
  • Jamie Newbold
    The rumen plays a central role in the ability of ruminants to produce human edible food from resources that are otherwise not available for consumption by mankind

    More info
    Jamie Newbold
    IBERS
    CV
    ANIMAL HEALTH: ALTERNATIVES TO THE USE OF ANTIBIOTICS
    Manipulating the Microbiome to Protect Against Diseases
  • Sandra Blome
    The use of vaccines is still one of the most effective tools to control infectious diseases in livestock and thus to safeguard animal health and productivity.

    More info
    Sandra Blome
    Friedrich Loeffler Institute
    CV
    ANIMAL HEALTH: ALTERNATIVES TO THE USE OF ANTIBIOTICS
    Future Directions on Vaccine Development
  • Marion P.G. Koopmans
    An estimated 70% of emerging infectious diseases (EID) in humans are zoonotic infections, where humans become infected after direct or indirect exposure to animals and the microbes that they carry. The impact of such zoonotic infections may be limited unless the pathogens...

    More info
    Marion P.G. Koopmans
    Erasmus MC
    CV
    OPENING CEREMONY
    One World, One Health: Fact or Fiction?

David Torrallardona

IRTA | Research Director in Monogastric Nutrition in Spain

Animal Production and Environmental Sustainability

A drastic increase in the global demand for animal products is expected for the next decades. The challenges faced by current animal production systems to meet such demand in a sustainable way will be discussed.

Sandra Edwards

New Castle University

Nutrition and Animal Welfare Indicators

Both the formulation of the diet and the method of feeding can affect animal welfare. However, in turn, the welfare state of the animal can also affect feeding behaviour and feed utilisation. This lecture will explore these two-way relationships and how such knowledge can be exploited in different livestock production systems.

Isabelle Oswald

INRA

Effect of Mycotoxins on Reduced Efficiency with Environmental Consequences

Food safety is a major issue throughout the world. In this respect, much attention needs to be paid to the possible contamination of food and feed by fungi and the risk of mycotoxin production. Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites produced by filamentous fungi, mainly by species from the genus Aspergillus, Fusarium and Penicillium. They are produced on a wide variety of raw materials before, during and after harvest. Very resistant to technological treatments, mycotoxins can be present in animal feed. The main mycotoxins from an animal health perspective are aflatoxins, ochratoxins, fumonisins, zearalenone and trichothecenes, specifically deoxynivalenol. These toxins have multiply effect on farm animals, they all affect the immune system and recent data show that the intestine is a target for these contaminants.

Animals are generally not exposed to one mycotoxin but to several toxins at the same time. Indeed, (i) most fungi are able to produce several mycotoxins simultaneously; (ii) moreover food and feed can be contaminated by several fungi species at the same time; (iii) complete diet is made from various different commodities. This is supported by global surveys underlying the multicontamination. The toxicity of combinations of mycotoxins cannot always be predicted based upon their individual toxicities. Interactions between concomitantly occurring mycotoxins can be antagonistic, additive, or synergistic.

Jack Dekkers

Iowa State University

Using Genetics to Improve Resistance to Disease

Genetic improvement has been very effective at increasing levels of production in livestock but not at improving resistance to disease. The purpose of this presentation will be to discuss strategies to improve disease resistance, disease tolerance, or robustness, with specific applications to Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome virus infections in pigs. Opportunities and challenges for the use of genomics for genetic improvement will be discussed also.

Jamie Newbold

IBERS | Director of Research

Manipulating the Microbiome to Protect Against Diseases

The rumen plays a central role in the ability of ruminants to produce human edible food from resources that are otherwise not available for consumption by mankind. Fermentation in the rumen also has the potential to influence the health and wellbeing of both the host and man through the nutritional quality and safety of meat and milk and through potential deleterious environmental consequences due to emission of greenhouse gases and excessive N excretion in faeces and urine. Traditional studies on rumen microbiology have relied on our ability to culture and characterise microorganisms from the rumen. Whilst significant progress has been made using these techniques over the years, it is recognised that only a relatively small proportion of the microbes within the rumen are recovered leaving us ignorant about the roles and activities of the vast majority of the rumen microbial ecosystem. Molecular techniques are allowing both quantitative and qualitative studies on microbial populations in the rumen to be carried out. Ribosomal genes have been used both to quantify different how specific microbial groups respond to quantitatively and to more qualitatively describe the rumen microbial population and changes induced by manipulation through the characterization of 18/16S rRNA gene pools through massively parallel amplcon sequencing. However, increasingly studies are expanding to not only to consider which microbes are present in the rumen but also the functional genes present, their expression in the rumen and how this might ultimately allow an increased understanding of the role of the rumen in the health and wellbeing of man and animals.

Sandra Blome

Friedrich Loeffler Institute

Future Directions on Vaccine Development

The use of vaccines is still one of the most effective tools to control infectious diseases in livestock and thus to safeguard animal health and productivity. Up to now, conventional vaccines are employed in the majority of cases but drawbacks are seen with the differentiability of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA or marker strategy), in the efficacy spectrum, and those vaccine might have constraints and restrictions in production.

The perfect vaccine that could be used in all possible scenarios should induce reliable protection against horizontal (and, where necessary, vertical) transmission within a short time, protect against a broad range of viral variants, be innocuous and safe in vaccinated animals and other species, be easy to use, and acceptable in terms of consumer protection. In addition, the perfect vaccine should have marker properties, allowing differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA), accompanied by a reliable test system for disease surveillance and confirmation. Finally, vaccine production should be easy and at low cost using a standardized protocol. Emergency response and easy licensing should be possible.

Unsurprisingly, such a vaccine does not exist. However, recent advances in vaccinology have brought about new possibilities that could help to get closer to highly efficacious, fast-response vaccines against old enemies and new viruses. Examples will be given on recently licensed vaccines and future options using platform technologies.

Marion P.G. Koopmans

DVM PhD Head department of Viroscience

One World, One Health: Fact or Fiction?

An estimated 70% of emerging infectious diseases (EID) in humans are zoonotic infections, where humans become infected after direct or indirect exposure to animals and the microbes that they carry. The impact of such zoonotic infections may be limited unless the pathogens are widespread and exposure is frequent, but zoonotic infections may become a global public health threat when they acquire the ability to spread efficiently between humans and develop into regional or global outbreaks called pandemics. The history of mankind has been shaped by such events, with for instance the plague epidemics caused by Yersinia pestis that were associated with waves of globalization in the Middle Ages through the colonial history of Europe, different pandemics of influenza, that occur when a new influenza viruses is introduced from the animal world, or the emergence of HIV, introduced into the human population in the first half of the 20th century. While the burden of infectious diseases has been reduced hugely with the development of public health programs like water and food sanitation, and introduction of vaccines and antibiotics in the 20th century, the fast expansion of the human population and globalization of travel and (food and animal) trade have lead to a rebound with increasing problems with EID outbreaks. Combined, the changing dynamics of infectious diseases lead to the new challenge of our times: emergence of potential pandemic disease problems resulting from complex interactions between humans, animals and their environment, each with their own healthy and disease causing microorganisms. The One Health approach to EID tries to develop insights in disease prevention through collaborative research across the human-animal-environmental interface .

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WHERE IS THE PROTEIN OF THE 21ST CENTURY?

There is a need to bring about a change in the model and in the system: The Food security as a future solution to transform the drive shafts of the profitability of livestock farms

The challenge of modern society is to ensure the worldwide demand for animal protein revolutionizing animal husbandry optimizing farming production and improving animal safety and health.

The change of population pattern affects the livestock production systems and the quality of the supplies offered to the market.

THE ANSWER, WITHOUT DOUBT,
MUST BE GLOBAL

  • 1In order to overcome this situation, nowadays Farmers are focusing on animal welfare permanently improving their husbandry methods and management systems.
  • 2Livestock farmers need state-of-the-art concepts to achieve the necessary balance between animal welfare considerations and investing efficiently, taking account of economic and technical production aspects.
  • 3The future of the industry will be about new regulations which will result in technological competition.
  • 4However, a comprehensive scientific and professional foundation will remain the decisive factor for productive livestock farming.
  • 5Veterinary work focuses on prevention, control and diagnosis of diseases, but today is also about antibiotic- resistant microorganisms between animals and humans in a One-health perspective.
  • 6We need to share One-health approach and engage a wide range of stakeholders including farmers, veterinarians, food safety professionals, medical doctors to address zoonotic transmission of pathogens that are resistant to antimicrobials.