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Tracks principales

Nutrición

Livestock Forum analizará con la ayuda de expertos internacionales de alto nivel algunos de los principales aspectos en materia de alimentación y nutrición animal entre los que destacan la sostenibilidad medioambiental
así como las consecuencias de la alimentación sobre
la salud y el bienestar de los animales.

SALUD ANIMAL & GENÉTICA

La jornada abordará a través de diversas sesiones una visión sobre los diferentes retos que existen actualmente en materia de salud animal y genética entre los que se encuentran las alternativas al uso de antibióticos, futuras implementaciones en el desarrollo de vacunas, así como nuevos métodos para la protección contra enfermedades.

INFORMACIÓN PRÁCTICA

Programa  |  ¿Cómo llegar? |  Galería de imágenes

SI QUIERES SABER MÁS

Entrevistas  |  Notas de prensa
  • David Torrallardona
    A drastic increase in the global demand for animal products is expected for the next decades. The challenges faced by current animal production systems to meet such demand in a sustainable way will be discussed

    More info
    David Torrallardona
    IRTA
    CV
    NUTRITION: CHALLENGING ANIMAL FEEDING
    Animal Production and Environmental Sustainability
  • Sandra Edwards
    Both the formulation of the diet and the method of feeding can affect animal welfare. However, in turn, the welfare state of the animal can also affect feeding behaviour and feed utilisation. This lecture will explore these two-way relationships and how such knowledge can be exploited in different livestock production systems

    More info
    Sandra Edwards
    New Castle University
    CV
    NUTRITION: CHALLENGING ANIMAL FEEDING
    Nutrition and Animal Welfare Indicators
  • Isabelle Oswald
    Food safety is a major issue throughout the world. In this respect, much attention needs to be paid to the possible contamination of food and feed by fungi and the risk of mycotoxin production

    More info
    Isabelle Oswald
    INRA
    CV
    NUTRITION: CHALLENGING ANIMAL FEEDING
    Effect of Mycotoxins on Reduced Efficiency with Environmental Consequences
  • Jack Dekkers
    Genetic improvement has been very effective at increasing levels of production in livestock but not at improving resistance to disease.

    More info
    Jack Dekkers
    Iowa State University
    CV
    ANIMAL HEALTH: ALTERNATIVES TO THE USE OF ANTIBIOTICS
    Using Genetics to Improve Resistance to Disease
  • Jamie Newbold
    The rumen plays a central role in the ability of ruminants to produce human edible food from resources that are otherwise not available for consumption by mankind

    More info
    Jamie Newbold
    IBERS
    CV
    ANIMAL HEALTH: ALTERNATIVES TO THE USE OF ANTIBIOTICS
    Manipulating the Microbiome to Protect Against Diseases
  • Sandra Blome
    The use of vaccines is still one of the most effective tools to control infectious diseases in livestock and thus to safeguard animal health and productivity.

    More info
    Sandra Blome
    Friedrich Loeffler Institute
    CV
    ANIMAL HEALTH: ALTERNATIVES TO THE USE OF ANTIBIOTICS
    Future Directions on Vaccine Development
  • Marion P.G. Koopmans
    An estimated 70% of emerging infectious diseases (EID) in humans are zoonotic infections, where humans become infected after direct or indirect exposure to animals and the microbes that they carry. The impact of such zoonotic infections may be limited unless the pathogens...

    More info
    Marion P.G. Koopmans
    Erasmus MC
    CV
    OPENING CEREMONY
    One World, One Health: Fact or Fiction?

David Torrallardona

IRTA | Research Director in Monogastric Nutrition in Spain

Animal Production and Environmental Sustainability

A drastic increase in the global demand for animal products is expected for the next decades. The challenges faced by current animal production systems to meet such demand in a sustainable way will be discussed.

Sandra Edwards

New Castle University

Nutrition and Animal Welfare Indicators

Both the formulation of the diet and the method of feeding can affect animal welfare. However, in turn, the welfare state of the animal can also affect feeding behaviour and feed utilisation. This lecture will explore these two-way relationships and how such knowledge can be exploited in different livestock production systems.

Isabelle Oswald

INRA

Effect of Mycotoxins on Reduced Efficiency with Environmental Consequences

Food safety is a major issue throughout the world. In this respect, much attention needs to be paid to the possible contamination of food and feed by fungi and the risk of mycotoxin production. Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites produced by filamentous fungi, mainly by species from the genus Aspergillus, Fusarium and Penicillium. They are produced on a wide variety of raw materials before, during and after harvest. Very resistant to technological treatments, mycotoxins can be present in animal feed. The main mycotoxins from an animal health perspective are aflatoxins, ochratoxins, fumonisins, zearalenone and trichothecenes, specifically deoxynivalenol. These toxins have multiply effect on farm animals, they all affect the immune system and recent data show that the intestine is a target for these contaminants.

Animals are generally not exposed to one mycotoxin but to several toxins at the same time. Indeed, (i) most fungi are able to produce several mycotoxins simultaneously; (ii) moreover food and feed can be contaminated by several fungi species at the same time; (iii) complete diet is made from various different commodities. This is supported by global surveys underlying the multicontamination. The toxicity of combinations of mycotoxins cannot always be predicted based upon their individual toxicities. Interactions between concomitantly occurring mycotoxins can be antagonistic, additive, or synergistic.

Jack Dekkers

Iowa State University

Using Genetics to Improve Resistance to Disease

Genetic improvement has been very effective at increasing levels of production in livestock but not at improving resistance to disease. The purpose of this presentation will be to discuss strategies to improve disease resistance, disease tolerance, or robustness, with specific applications to Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome virus infections in pigs. Opportunities and challenges for the use of genomics for genetic improvement will be discussed also.

Jamie Newbold

IBERS | Director of Research

Manipulating the Microbiome to Protect Against Diseases

The rumen plays a central role in the ability of ruminants to produce human edible food from resources that are otherwise not available for consumption by mankind. Fermentation in the rumen also has the potential to influence the health and wellbeing of both the host and man through the nutritional quality and safety of meat and milk and through potential deleterious environmental consequences due to emission of greenhouse gases and excessive N excretion in faeces and urine. Traditional studies on rumen microbiology have relied on our ability to culture and characterise microorganisms from the rumen. Whilst significant progress has been made using these techniques over the years, it is recognised that only a relatively small proportion of the microbes within the rumen are recovered leaving us ignorant about the roles and activities of the vast majority of the rumen microbial ecosystem. Molecular techniques are allowing both quantitative and qualitative studies on microbial populations in the rumen to be carried out. Ribosomal genes have been used both to quantify different how specific microbial groups respond to quantitatively and to more qualitatively describe the rumen microbial population and changes induced by manipulation through the characterization of 18/16S rRNA gene pools through massively parallel amplcon sequencing. However, increasingly studies are expanding to not only to consider which microbes are present in the rumen but also the functional genes present, their expression in the rumen and how this might ultimately allow an increased understanding of the role of the rumen in the health and wellbeing of man and animals.

Sandra Blome

Friedrich Loeffler Institute

Future Directions on Vaccine Development

The use of vaccines is still one of the most effective tools to control infectious diseases in livestock and thus to safeguard animal health and productivity. Up to now, conventional vaccines are employed in the majority of cases but drawbacks are seen with the differentiability of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA or marker strategy), in the efficacy spectrum, and those vaccine might have constraints and restrictions in production.

The perfect vaccine that could be used in all possible scenarios should induce reliable protection against horizontal (and, where necessary, vertical) transmission within a short time, protect against a broad range of viral variants, be innocuous and safe in vaccinated animals and other species, be easy to use, and acceptable in terms of consumer protection. In addition, the perfect vaccine should have marker properties, allowing differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA), accompanied by a reliable test system for disease surveillance and confirmation. Finally, vaccine production should be easy and at low cost using a standardized protocol. Emergency response and easy licensing should be possible.

Unsurprisingly, such a vaccine does not exist. However, recent advances in vaccinology have brought about new possibilities that could help to get closer to highly efficacious, fast-response vaccines against old enemies and new viruses. Examples will be given on recently licensed vaccines and future options using platform technologies.

Marion P.G. Koopmans

DVM PhD Head department of Viroscience

One World, One Health: Fact or Fiction?

An estimated 70% of emerging infectious diseases (EID) in humans are zoonotic infections, where humans become infected after direct or indirect exposure to animals and the microbes that they carry. The impact of such zoonotic infections may be limited unless the pathogens are widespread and exposure is frequent, but zoonotic infections may become a global public health threat when they acquire the ability to spread efficiently between humans and develop into regional or global outbreaks called pandemics. The history of mankind has been shaped by such events, with for instance the plague epidemics caused by Yersinia pestis that were associated with waves of globalization in the Middle Ages through the colonial history of Europe, different pandemics of influenza, that occur when a new influenza viruses is introduced from the animal world, or the emergence of HIV, introduced into the human population in the first half of the 20th century. While the burden of infectious diseases has been reduced hugely with the development of public health programs like water and food sanitation, and introduction of vaccines and antibiotics in the 20th century, the fast expansion of the human population and globalization of travel and (food and animal) trade have lead to a rebound with increasing problems with EID outbreaks. Combined, the changing dynamics of infectious diseases lead to the new challenge of our times: emergence of potential pandemic disease problems resulting from complex interactions between humans, animals and their environment, each with their own healthy and disease causing microorganisms. The One Health approach to EID tries to develop insights in disease prevention through collaborative research across the human-animal-environmental interface .

PROGRAMA NETWORKING DAY

9.00h - 9.30h

REGISTRATION

9.30h - 10.00h

INSTITUTIONAL INAUGURATION
10.00h - 11.00h
OPENING CEREMONY

Chairman: Juan José Badiola Díez | Consejo general de Colegios Veterinarios de España


One World, One Health: Fact or Fiction?

Marion Koopmans | Erasmus MC-Netherlands

11.30h - 14.00h

ANIMAL HEALTH & GENETICS
ALTERNATIVES TO THE USE OF ANTIBIOTICS


Chairman: Joaquim Segalés | IRTA-CReSA

 

  • Future Directions on Vaccine Development

    Sandra Blome | Friedrich Loeffler Institute

  • Manipulating the Microbiome to Protect Against Diseases

    Jamie Newbold | IBERS

  • Using Genetics to Improve Resistance to Disease

    Jack Dekkers | Iowa State University

15.00h - 17.30h

NUTRITION
CHALLENGING ANIMAL FEEDING


Chairman: Joaquim Brufau | IRTA

 

  • Animal Production and Environmental Sustainability

    David Torrallardona | IRTA

  • Effect of Mycotoxins on Reduced Efficiency with Environmental Consequences

    Isabelle Oswald | INRA

  • Nutrition and Animal Welfare Indicators

    Sandra Edwards | Newcastle University

 

Sigue informado con las últimas novedades del congreso.

Consulta las últimas notas de prensa

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PARTNER

4.000€*

  • 8 Pases Congreso.
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  • 1 material en kit congresista.
  • Logo en web - Nivel 1.
  • Logo en acceso.
  • Logo en campañas de comunicación
  • Dto. 20% en Oportunidades de Esponsorización
  • Entrevista en newsletter
  • 1 Parking

SPONSOR

2.000€*

  • 4 Pases Congreso.
  • 1 material en kit congresista.
  • Logo en web - Nivel 2
  • Logo en acceso
  • Logo en campañas de comunicación
  • Dto. 10% en Oportunidades de Esponsorización

CONGRESISTA

125€*

  • Entrada Congreso
  • Comida networking
  • Guardarropía
  • Kit congresita

OPORTUNIDADES
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ESPONSORIZACIÓN

2.000€*

  • Lanyard 2.000€
  • Wi-Fi 2.000€
  • Pase 2.000 €

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+34 93 233 28 62
amas@firabarcelona.com

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¿DÓNDE ESTÁ LA PROTEÍNA DEL S.XXI?

Existe la necesidad de provocar un cambio en el modelo productivo y en el sistema: La seguridad alimentaria se presenta como una solución de futuro para transformar los ejes de la rentabilidad de las explotaciones ganaderas

El reto de la sociedad moderna es garantizar la demanda mundial de proteínas animales revolucionando la optimización de la producción ganadera y mejorando la seguridad y la salud animal.

Los cambios de población afectan a los sistemas de producción de ganado y la calidad de los suministros que se ofrecen al mercado.

LA RESPUESTA,
DEBE SER GLOBAL

  • 1Para estar a la altura de los retos actuales, los ganaderos se están centrando en el bienestar animal para mejorar permanentemente sus métodos de cría y sistemas de gestión.
  • 2Los ganaderos necesitan estar a la vanguardia de la técnica para lograr el necesario equilibrio entre las consideraciones de bienestar animal y que la inversión eficiente, teniendo en cuenta los aspectos de la producción económica y técnica.
  • 3El futuro de la industria estará marcado por los nuevos reglamentos, lo que se traducirá en la competencia tecnológica
  • 4Una base científica y profesional integral es el factor decisivo para la ganadería productiva.
  • 5El trabajo del veterinario se centra en la prevención, control y diagnóstico de las enfermedades, pero en la actualidad, también aborda los microorganismos resistentes a los antibióticos en los animales y humanos desde la perspectiva 'One Health'.
  • 6Buscamos compartir el enfoque 'One-health' y la participación de un amplio espectro de partes interesadas, incluidos los ganaderos, veterinarios, profesionales de la seguridad alimentaria y médicos para hacer frente a la transmisión zoonótica de patógenos resistentes a los antimicrobianos.

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2016 Networking Day
27 abril 2017 Networking Day
2018 Exhibition + Congress

 

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